Improving YouTube’s Content ID could help creators of all stripes

Improving YouTube’s Content ID could help creators of all stripes

Why not make Content ID more accessible and transparent?

Much has been written about YouTube’s Content ID program, a fingerprinting technology that allows rights holders to find and claim their music or movies when uploaded to YouTube.  The technology was introduced in 2008 in the wake of Viacom’s lawsuit against YouTube and since then has helped (some) creators mitigate the problem of piracy on the popular UGC (user-generated content) site.

Those who have access to the Content ID system can uploaded reference files and use a dashboard to choose how matches should be handled.  They can be limited based on audio, video, and length.  Matching content then can be blocked, removed, or monetized based on territorial rights.

MUSO piracy report spots some new global trends

MUSO piracy report spots some new global trends

A report in today’s Torrent Freak noted that content protection firm (anti-piracy) firm Muso recently released its annual Global Piracy Insights Report for 2016 so I was prompted to take a look to see what what’s new on the piracy landscape.  According to the report there’s been a, “massive shift towards direct downloads for music content – growing by 31% in 2015”  In addition the report found that “28% of all visits to piracy sites in 2015 were through mobile devises, up 8% during the year.”

First Look, Facebook’s New Rights Manager Tools

First Look, Facebook’s New Rights Manager Tools

Facebook finally joins YouTube in offering anti-piracy content detection tools

Facebook has been promising for some time to introduce tools that would allow rights holders to automatically detect and remove pirated content from its pages.

The company has endured a lot of bad publicity around the freebooting of viral YouTube videos on its pages, but Facebook’s also long been a place where pirated movies and music found a cozy habitat.  That is–until now. I’ve recently begun to utilize this tool to manage Facebook DMCA takedowns and wanted to share my first impressions, but first a bit of background.

First of all, I’m thrilled that Facebook, with all its resources, has finally begun to take copyright infringement seriously.  In introducing the new tool last month the Facebook development team explained why the company had finally stepped up:

New report on how (some) companies enable malware’s spread

New report on how (some) companies enable malware’s spread

Google updates its anti-piracy report

Google updates its anti-piracy report

Google’s updated piracy report offers the some well-worn excuses

It’s that time of year.  The time of year where Google rolls out a shiny update on its “How Google Fights Piracy” report.  Google began the tradition in 2013.  At the time I noted that Google’s claim to be a “leader” in the fight against piracy was its first mistake. With today’s update, it appears the Silicon Valley giant hasn’t backed down from that dubious claim (or many others).

Katie Oyama, Senior Policy Counsel, Google asserts that, “We take protecting creativity online seriously, and we’re doing more to help battle copyright-infringing activity than ever before.”  Yet, in spite of Oyama’s rosy quote, in truth the reality (for creators) battling online piracy continues to be a bleak one.