Improving YouTube’s Content ID could help creators of all stripes

Why not make Content ID more accessible and transparent?

Much has been written about YouTube's Content ID program, a fingerprinting technology that allows rights holders to find and claim their music or movies when uploaded to YouTube.  The technology was introduced in 2008 in the wake of Viacom's lawsuit against YouTube and since then has helped (some) creators mitigate the problem of piracy on the popular UGC (user-generated content) site. Those who have access to the Content ID system can uploaded reference files and use a dashboard to choose how matches should be handled.  They can be limited based on audio, video, and length.  Matching content then can be blocked, removed, or monetized based on territorial rights.
The Pirate Bay

Newhoff responds to Pirate Bay founder Peter Sunde

The Illusion of More's David Newhoff takes Pirate Bay founder Peter Sunde to task

If you haven't had the opportunity to read David Newhoff's thoughts regarding Pirate Bay founder Peter Sunde's recent interview published on Motherboard please take the time to do so.   It's truly a must read. Sunde spent a brief time in prison in 2014 for his role in operating the notorious torrent site whose popularity spawned clones around the globe and gave rise to the  well-entrenched meme that piracy was somehow morally and politically justifiable.

Vox Indie is dedicated to exploring issues surrounding online copyright and content creation. As a 33-year indie film and journalism veteran, I’ll share my perspectives on piracy and the damage done to creators worldwide. My hope is to share ideas about possible solutions and to foster a greater appreciation and understanding of creators’ rights in our evolving digital landscape.